The Navajo Nation Zoo in Window Rock, Arizona was one of the places my family and I visited while staying in Gallup, New Mexico. The zoo houses up to 100 animals and features 50 different animal species from all around Arizona and New Mexico.

What makes this zoo special is that it is the only zoo owned and operated by an American Indian Tribe. Most of the animals in the zoo are very important to the Navajo Nation. The animals in the zoo are ones that appear in their stories or are considered sacred to the tribe.

The zoo is over 40 years old and was originally started with one orphaned bear. David Mikesic is the zoologist for the zoo and knows the story for every animal.

Navajo Nation Zoo

All the animals in the zoo are there because they need a home and wouldn’t survive in the wild. They are rescues or are adopted by the zoo because of things such as injuries and having lost their families. At the Navajo Nation Zoo, there is no trading of animals to other zoos for breeding. 

owls at Navajo Nation Zoo

Animals in the zoo include black bears, golden eagles, bighorn sheep, raccoons, wolves, cougars, foxes, elks, owls and more. Walking through this park, I was amazed to learn how cool some of the animals were along with their back stories. Some of the animals in the zoo are also endangered.

Cougars at Navajo Nation Zoo

One of the things I really liked about the zoo, were the signs at each animal habitat shared why the animal was important to the Navajo people. The signs also share the name of the animals in English and Navajo.

Navajo Nation Zoo in Window Rock, AZ

The golden eagle sanctuary was built in 2016 and is the newest structure at the zoo. There were several eagles in the sanctuary. All the Eagles had serious injuries that would not allow for them to survive in the wild.

Golden Eagle exhibit Navajo Nation Zoo

I learned that the Golden Eagle is a very sacred and important bird in the Navajo culture. They should be respected and greatly honored. It is said that a Navajo person can keep an eagle feather only after it is properly blessed by a medicine man.

Golden Eagle exhibit Navajo Nation Zoo

One of the favorite animals that we saw was an albino Raccoon. Something about the raccoon was just cool to me because of its unique colors.

The habitats for all of the animals were all quite impressive. Each habitat gives the animal room to roam around with plenty of space to be happy. Each habitat also caters to each animal’s specific needs. I thought this was very cool for the animals to be as happy as the zoo can make them. Happier animals lead to happier visitors too.

Navajo Nation Zoo

The Navajo Zoo has two black bears; Bessie and Abbey. As a cub, Bessie was orphaned and caught in a trap and then brought to the zoo. Abbey was also orphaned and brought here.

When we visited, the two bears had built holes in their habitat where they sleep and use for hibernation.

As well as the animals in outdoor habitats, there was an indoor area with fish, reptiles, and insects.

Duck at the Navajo Nation Zoo

There was also a black-footed ferret, which is an endangered species. The Navajo Nation Zoo is only one of 23 facilities in the United States with these ferrets.

black footed ferret at Navajo Nation Zoo

While I visited, I saw the some of the fish and reptiles being fed. It was really interesting and I suggest calling before you go find out the feeding times.

Navajo Nation Zoo Information

The zoon is a 30-minute drive from Gallup, New Mexico
www.navajozoo.org
Address: 34 AZ-264, Window Rock, AZ 86515


WHEN TO VISIT ARIZONA

Arizona is a year-round destination, although people head to different parts of the state at different times of the year. In Phoenix, Tucson, and other parts of the desert, the high season runs from October to mid-May, with the highest hotel rates from January to April. At the Grand Canyon, summer is the busy season.

If you enjoyed this article about Visiting the Navajo Nation Zoo in Window Rock, you’ll also love A Perfect Day, In Yuma Arizona.


Traveling To Arizona Soon? Here are a few tips:

How to get there:  Driving in Arizona is no different than driving in any other state.  You can also hop on a bus, train, or public transportation, and look out your window to see saguaro arms waving you in.

Where to stay: There are many places to stay in Arizona. There is a wide range of hotels, from budget to luxury. For a luxury hotel that won’t break the bank, I recommend the Quality Inn Navajo Nation Capital, which is currently the #1 hotel on Tripadvisor. For a mid-level hotel, I suggest the SpringHill Suites by Marriott Gallup. You can also check HotelsCombined for the best Window, Rock Hotel Rates.

Hotels in Window, Rock Arizona: Check Trip Advisor reviews for Quality Inn Navajo Nation Capital or SpringHill Suites by Marriott Gallup.

What to pack: First things first, you only need to have experienced the Arizona sun one time before you realize how strong it really is. Hiking, walking through trails and laying by the pool all require protection from the sun, especially the Arizona sun. Pack a wide-brimmed hat, which is preferable over a baseball cap, to cover your entire face. Make sure you pack sunscreen that is SPF 30 or higher over any exposed skin, including the back of your neck.  Lastly, don’t forget to protect your eyes from the Arizona sunshine with sunglasses.

The Arizona desert temperatures can fluctuate 30-40 degrees in one day, so be sure to pack light layers for daytime and others that will keep you warm in the evenings, including a winter hat, when the sun sets and cooler air moves in.


Arizona Trip Essentials


6 Indispensable Items to Pack for a Arizona Vacation


Read More About Arizona

A Perfect Day, In Yuma Arizona
A Perfect Getaway to Hacienda del Sol, Tucson Arizona

 

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Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers.